FAQ

What is it like moving to New York City from out of state and getting a job right away without having been to New York city before?
What is it like moving to New York City from out of state and getting a job right away without having been to New York city before?In September, 1984, I did exactly that.I graduated college in May, 1984, with the intention of moving to NYC to land a job in the book publishing industry. The summer before I moved, I worked a demanding construction job for an independent contractor that involved long hours but very high pay, and I banked as much as I could in advance of my move.I had the advantage of already having a place to stay before I moved: The son of a family friend already lived on the Upper West Side, and he was looking for a roommate. So I packed my things, flew to New York, and moved in.And I had relative luck in landing my first job. I already had my resume polished and printed, and I began sending them out to all of the top New York publishing companies, and many smaller companies as well. Three weeks after I moved here, I got a call from a woman who ran a medium-sized company, asking me to come in for an interview. We hit it off instantly, chiefly because the warehouse that her company used was only two blocks from where I lived in suburban Chicago, and, I told her, I used to play tag football on the lawn. She called me back a week later and offered me a job, I accepted, and I began work around October 1st, only about four weeks after moving here.And though I didn’t need it immediately, I was certainly glad I had banked a sizable nest egg. The starting salary was $10,000 per year, and rent, student loan payments, and ordinary living expenses stretched my meager paycheck to the limit.
Who do you recommend to use for a worker’s compensation insurance in the state of New York (not the city) for an O/O trucking company with 1 employee?
Thanks for the A2A.I would consider 2 options and secure a quote from each in order to decide which makes more sense for your specific needs.State Workers’ Compensation Fund: The New York State Insurance Fund is a not-for-profit agency of the State of New York that was established in 1914 to provide a guaranteed source of workers' compensation insurancecoverage at the lowest possible cost to employers within New York State. You can secure a quote from them here - NYSIFA PEO (Professional Employer Organization): A PEO is a business who can provide WC Insurance, along with a other services. They take the headache out of operating a small business (not JUST workers’ compensation). Generally speaking, PEO’s pool risk of smaller businesses, contracting in a “co-employment” relationship in order to deliver their service and provide competitive rates. For example, if you need help with payroll, State or Federal taxes, and/or health insurance…(IN ADDITION to just WC Insurance), you may want to consider using a PEO. Some PEO’s won’t do business with one-person businesses because the risk is too high. There are hundreds of PEO’s across the country to choose from. Here is a link for the National PEO directory that explains more. What is a PEOHope that helps!
Is it possible to run a NY LLC out of the New York State and even out of the US?
Sure, it is possible.Registering Business in New YorkIf you decided to open a new business that will be based in New York you can choose from several options:Sole OwnersSole Proprietorship: Sole owners of New York-based businesses could opt for sole proprietorship as the easiest form of business organization. Not the most recommended, given the liability a sole proprietor assumes as a result of owning a business. No registration with New York State Department of State is necessary, but it is recommended to obtain a Business Certificate (DBA), and if you plan to hire employees then also obtain an EIN.Single Member LLC: Limited liability company, as the name suggests, is an entity that allows its owners to limit the liability of the business to the entity itself, shielding the owners' personal assets. This type of entity is recommended for most small businesses.  By default your LLC will be taxed as "disregarded entity", meaning you will file your LLC tax return as part of your personal tax return. Keep in mind though - LLC is a flexible entity, which means you have the option of electing it to be taxed as S-Corp (assuming you are a U.S. person) or C-Corp. Learn more about LLC here, and about the details of forming LLC in New York here.Corporation: You can also form a corporation and be a sole shareholder with 100% of all shares. Corporations have more formalities than LLCs (for example in New York you are required to have bylaws and maintain minutes of meetings in corporate records), but provide similar limited liability protection. That's one of the reasons this entity type is often more suitable for bigger companies, or those who seek major investment.  Corporations can be taxed as S-Corp or C-Corp, with each form of taxation having its pros and cons. Keep in mind, you can elect your corporation to be S-Corp only if you, as the sole shareholder, are a U.S. person.  Learn more about corporations here, and about the details of incorporating in New York here.PartnersGeneral Partnership: Like sole proprietorship, this entity type does not require registration with the New York State Department of State, but it also does not protect the owners from business liability, and therefore is usually not recommended. A General Partnership needs to obtain a Business Certificate (DBA), and obtain an EIN.Multiple Member LLC: like Single Member LLC for sole owner, Multiple Member LLC is often the entity of choice for small and new businesses with more than one partner.Corporation: Since corporation can have many shareholders, and transfering ownership is relatively easy (though share transfer) corporation might be a good choice of entity for business with partners.  Keep in mind though - S Corporations are limited to 100 shareholders who must be physical U.S. persons. That means corporations owned (partially or fully) by non-U.S. persons or legal entities, cannot be elected as S-Corp, and therefore subject to double taxation of an C-Corp. In cases like that it would be recommended to consider choosing LLC instead.Limited Partnerships: Limited partnerships come in different forms, depending on the state (LP, LLP, LLLP). Though Limited Partnerships have their own purpose and place, for most cases we believe an LLC would serve its owners well enough, therefore at this point we do not cover Limited Partnerships.Existing Out-of-State CompaniesAn existing company registered in another state or country (called "foreign corporation", "foreign LLC", etc) looking to conduct business in New York might be required to foreign qualify in New York. This rule typically applies to companies looking to open a physical branch in New York, lease an office or warehouse, hire employees, etc."Foreign" businesses that do not create "strong nexus" by moving physically to New York might still be required to obtain Certificate of Authority to Collect Sales Tax from New York Department of Taxation and Finance if selling taxable products or services using local dropshippers.
How long would it take to walk from one end of the state of New York to the other?
It would take about 154 hours to walk from Niagara Falls in the Northwest corner of the state to Montauk Point on the end of Long Island in the Southeast corner.https://www.google.com/maps/dir/...